December Doula Cafe

The next Doula Cafe will be on Tuesday, December 12th from 10:00-11:30am at the Tokyu Plaza on the Meiji Dori/Omotesando crossing.

This will be an introduction to the work of doulas:  what doulas are, how we can help and support women through their pregnancies, labour and the post-partum period, and how I work in particular with my clients.

For those who are interested in having a doula, please come along to find out more while we chat over tea or coffee.  Currently I am open to take on clients from mid-Feb 2018 onwards but feel free to get in touch if you are due sooner and we can discuss availability.

If you’d like to come, please let me know at the email address here.

Doula Cafe

The next Doula Cafe will be on Monday, November 13th from 10:00-11:30am at the Tokyu Plaza on the Meiji Dori/Omotesando crossing.

This will be about inductions – when or why they might be done and what you might expect.  Feel free to also bring any questions you have about doulas, your hospital, labour, childbirth in Japan and babies in general.

If you’d like to come, please let me know at the email address here 🙂

 

Doula Cafe

The next Doula Cafe will be on Tuesday, October 10th at the Tokyu Plaza Starbucks (6th floor) in Harajuku, from 10:30am-12pm🙂  The Tokyu Plaza is on the Meiji Dori/Omotesando crossing.

We’ll talk about ways to manage labour without an epidural (even for those planning an epidural, there will likely be a period of time where some of these ways might be useful).

If you’d like to join, send me a quick email here.

 

 

The next Doula Cafe

The next Doula Cafe will be on Tuesday, September 19th!  It will be a lunchtime meeting at the Tokyu Plaza Starbucks (6th floor) in Harajuku, from 12-1:30pm🙂  The Tokyu Plaza is on the Meiji Dori/Omotesando crossing.

This will be a free topic meeting where you can come with any questions you have about doulas, your hospital, labour, childbirth in Japan and babies.

If you’d like to join, send me a quick email

Breathing for Birth – New Classes

I’m really excited to announce my new Breathing for Birth classes that I’ll be holding twice a month at My Body My Pilates studio in Minami Azabu!  The first class will be on Wed, Sept 13th!

The classes will be held on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of each month for one hour.  The class size will be limited to 8-10 women.

In this one hour class, we will be getting in touch with our bodies and minds in preparation for labour and birth.  We will focus on our breathing and the ways in which it can help us during labour  – as an essential tool for relaxation in labour as well as the crucial role our breathing plays in helping us manage our contractions more effectively.

Breathing is the most natural thing in the world for us to do, and we breathe without even thinking that we are doing so.  Yet in labour it can be one of the most challenging parts – breathing regularly and effectively through contractions to help your uterus work as well as possible and giving you a way to stay in control of your labour can be hard work.  Through these classes, you’ll have the chance to focus just on your breathing for labour, and learn how you can use it to relax and prepare your mind for each stage of labour.

Combined together with other gentle relaxation techniques and massage, this one hour class should leave you feeling refreshed, more empowered and more in touch with your body.

It’s a great compliment to any other comprehensive birth preparation class you are doing or may do, and I encourage women to come to as many classes as they like to get the full benefit.

Day:  Every 2nd and 4th Wednesday of the month

Time:  10:30-11:30am

Place:  My Body My Pilates https://www.mybodymypilates.com/contact-studio-location/

Class fee:  1,500 yen per participant (limited to 8-10 women)

RSVP:  Please let me know if you’d like to come by RSVP’ing to me at skwilson88@hotmail.com

Schedule for the next few months:

September:  13th, 27th

October:  11th, 25th

November:  8th, 22nd

 

 

Back from hols and next Doula Cafe

My family and I got back from the UK a few days ago and I was greeted immediately by a labour!  It was a very very fast one (around 2 hours) and the mum seems to be doing really well!

The next Doula Cafe will be on Monday, September 4th!  It will be at the Tokyu Plaza Starbucks (6th floor) in Harajuku, from 10:00-11:30am🙂  The Tokyu Plaza is on the Meiji Dori/Omotesando crossing.

If you are curious about what a doula does and how one can support you through your pregnancy and labour (and beyond), please come along!  I’ll be sharing my own birth experiences and what I learned from each of them, as well as new things I learned from helping clients.

I’m currently fully booked for births for the whole of October (always a very busy month for babies!).  I have limited availability for November and December, and am able to take on just 1 last-minute client for early-mid September.   Please contact me as soon as possible if you’d like birth doula support!

If you’d like to come to the Doula Cafe, please email me.  My address is here

Doula Cafe

The next Doula cafe will be on Friday, July 7th!  It will be at the Tokyu Plaza Starbucks (6th floor) in Harajuku, from 12:30-1:30 – a lunchtime gathering 🙂  The Tokyu Plaza is on the Meiji Dori/Omotesando crossing.

We will talk about life after baby is born, and different support options available!

This will be the last Doula Cafe before September as I’ll be away after that for the summer.

If you’d like to come to the Doula Cafe, please email me.  My address is here

Looking forward to seeing those who come 🙂

Seijo Kinoshita Hospital

This week I had a birth at Seijo Kinoshita hospital in Setagaya ku,  very close to Seijogakuenmae station on the Odakyu line.

It was another new hospital for me, so I was looking forward finding out how they looked after the labour and birth.  The building itself is lovely.  It’s very modern and apparently has won some kind of architectural award.  Inside everything is very calming and quite plain – but really very nice, and there’s lot of green space, too.  I think a lot of thought went in to making it a relaxing environment.

The labour itself was quite straightforward.  Although the mother had to be induced (she was 41+4), it went smoothly – seaweed sticks followed by balloon to help dilation on day 1, then a prostaglandin drip on day 2.  The mother was going to have the Oxytocin (pitocin) drip on day 3 but the prostaglandin drip seemed to be enough to get things started and she had her baby within 6 hours of starting that.   She also wanted an epidural.  This was an integral part to her birth plan, and the hospital actually does epidurals (I believe anytime around the clock) which is not so common in Japan.  It was a “walking” epidural, though, so my client still had feeling – she just felt a lot more comfortable.

The midwives were lovely.  The were really attentive (in part because it was a quiet day for them) and hands-on with comfort measures.  They were also excited to have me there as a doula and I was made to feel very welcome.  2 of the midwives there could speak decent enough English (Mastuo san and Miyoshi san) and had a really gentle way with my client during her labour.   Kinoshita sensei could also speak decent English and was able to communicate well enough with my clients about everything.

During the actual delivery, my client was encouraged to push how she felt she wanted to. Although eventually they did get her to move on to her back (that’s basically the case with almost all hospitals here).  She really didn’t want an episiotomy and they were great with that (some hospitals here do them a lot, while others don’t).  They said “Ok, that’s fine.  We don’t think you’ll need one and we’ll do our best to make sure you don’t tear much”.  As it was, she only had a very small tear and just a couple of stitches.  I’m glad they respected her wishes on that encouraged her in a way to push that would let her perineum stretch gently.

I’d certainly be happy to recommend Seijo Kinoshita as a birthing hospital.

http://www.kinohosp.com/

May Doula Cafe!

The next Doula cafe will be on Monday, May 8th!  It will be at the Tokyu Plaza Starbucks (6th floor) in Harajuku, from 10:30-12:00.  The Tokyu Plaza is on the Meiji Dori/Omotesando crossing.

We will talk about the hospitals where you are expecting to give birth at and I’ll share with you my experiences in these places 🙂   We’ll also talk generally about anything and everything related to pregnancy, labour and having a baby in Tokyo!

It’s a great chance to find out what a doula does and how one can help you through your pregnancy and at your labour!

If you’d like to come, please email me.  My address is here.

Looking forward to see everyone who comes!

Labour at Seibo Hospital

I had my first experience as a doula in Seibo hospital (International Catholic hospital) 2 weeks ago.   Seibo hospital is located in Shinjuku-ku near Shimo-Ochiai station and within walking distance from Takadanobaba as well.

I had heard a lot about Seibo hospital over the years having had friends who had delivered there as well as comments from others on various groups about their experiences there.  Everything I heard was generally positive, so I was very excited to have the chance to see it for myself first-hand.

My client was expecting her 3rd child and was quite new to Japan, having only arrived a few months previously.  Her hospital options were already somewhat limited due to the fact that a lot of places get booked up very much in advance (it’s not unusual for hospitals or birth clinics to require you to “book in” for your birth there anytime between 12-20 weeks depending on the place).  She’d heard of Seibo and felt comfortable there after her first visit, and was able to have a spot there for delivery so she decided to stay with it.

As it was my client’s 3rd labour, I wasn’t expecting a marathon one (although you really never know).  As it was, she arrived at the hospital at around 10:30pm and her baby was born just after 1am.   The midwives were lovely and very attentive, although those on duty didn’t speak any English so I was having to help translate for both sides when necessary.  Perhaps for someone wanting a very “natural” labour they were maybe a bit too attentive (my client was told that there would be constant fetal monitoring for no reason than it was hospital policy  – baby was absolutely fine with contractions and heart rate). With that constant fetal monitoring came hands all over my client trying to keep the monitor in place as she moved about.  We both felt this was too much, especially as my client didn’t like the feeling of hands on her abdomen during contractions and things were fine with the baby.  I asked the midwives if they could stop the constant monitoring at my client’s request…and after going away to have a talk with the doctor, it was finally agreed that it was ok for the monitor to be taken off.  I think this is one example where having a doula to advocate for you during labour is very useful.

Anyway, my client actually progressed very quickly and it wasn’t long before she was pushing.  In Seibo, the labour rooms and the delivery rooms are different places, so she had to be moved to the delivery room (some hospitals and birth clinics are like that while others have all-in-one LDRs).  She instinctively got into an all-4s position on the bed.   The midwives did ask her to lie on her back but my client wasn’t going to move (and there was no reason why she should).  I’m glad that they didn’t insist more strongly as that would have been unnecessary I think.  It was great to see baby be born smoothly that way.

Overall, her stay for a few days afterwards was really good she said.  The food was good, the nurses were kind and some could speak some English.  For her, it was her 3rd country to labour in (she has had experiences in the U.S. and New Zealand), so it was interesting to see how each place differed.

I would be really happy to help at a birth in Seibo again.  It seems that while they do have hospital policies regarding certain things in labour, they are also able to be flexible if asked when the time actually comes…although, as I said, having a doula there to help advocate is a big advantage 🙂